Efficient browsing / productivity with Vimium

For quite a while now I’ve been doing pretty much everything on Linux with just keyboard shortcuts. I’ve switched to a tiling window manager called i3 which eliminates the need for a mouse as everything from resizing window frames, making them full screen or tiling them in a certain way can be done with the press of a few buttons. I’ve found that it increased my productivity by quite a big margin and I feel like mouse was just a block in the road towards productivity.

Only place mouse was needed for me was for browsing the web. Luckily, even though a bit late I’ve found a way to even get rid of that by using a plugin called Vimium for Chrome. I’m a big time Vim user and it’s kind of funny that I thought the learning curve that I had to go through for vim and the hours I spent learning it could only be used for stuff like coding / text editing. The time I invested learning vim actually pays off when you consider plugins like Vimium, which allows you to use the same keyboard shortcut like features you’re used to in Vim and works as a replacement for your mouse.

It’s actually difficult to imagine how the experience is like when you consider the fact that there’s no mouse at all, you just press keys and things work the same way as if you had a mouse. From opening links in new tabs, scrolling, interacting with custom frames, clicking on elements, opening older tabs from history or going through your bookmarks; everything works smoothly as if you’re doing it with a real mouse.

I’m starting to get used to it, so far it seems pretty easy to get started and I highly encourage people to try it out and see for yourself how it’s like. You don’t actually need previous experience with vim and the shortcuts can be configured as the plugin is quite flexible. Try it out, who knows you might even like it 🙂