Power Saving GOD Mode on Linux (Part – 1)


Some people who use Linux on a daily basis have a lot of issues configuring their system to attain the optimal power saving features supported by their hardware (mainly due to lack of experience), which is why the battery life on Linux is not even close to that on Windows. It’s not just about configuring the features, sometimes it can be due to the driver itself lacking good power management support for certain hardware.

Anyway, I’ve been looking around a LOT and finally I think I’ve achieved some of the wisdom to understand how and what to mess around with to get the most out of my laptop’s battery and I wish to share it with you! 🙂

Okay, so there’s a lot of things to look for & there are many tweaks to be made depending on your preferences & hardware. For the basic configuration it should be the same regardless of your hardware, but for advanced configuration I’ll show you the steps towards detecting & enabling the power management configurations in the kernel level manually. There’s a lot of things to write about so I’ve decided to make it into two parts. This part will only cover the basics, on the next part I hope to cover the advanced configuration stuff.

 

Basic Configuration:

First of all, there’s 2 main utilities on Linux that are out there which automatically optimises your hardware settings for power management depending on whether your laptop is plugged to a power source or not.

1) TLP (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/TLP)

2) Laptop-mode-tools (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Laptop_Mode_Tools)

You have to choose one of the above tools but not both as they conflict with each other. I personally would recommend going with TLP as it has good power management defaults & it automatically does all the things for you where as in laptop mode you would have to configure the settings manually before you can start using it. Which can be quite time consuming but it’s upto you. Please follow the steps in the wiki accordingly, and also note that in case of tlp or laptop-mode you may need to add usb device hardware id’s (for stuff like a mouse, etc.) in the configuration file to make sure they work after your laptop is unplugged from the power source.

 

After installing and configuring one of the above tools, I’d recommend installing Powertop (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/powertop)

Powertop is the main tool that you rely on to get statistics about your laptop’s power usage.

With this utility you get to see which device is using how much Watt of power.

powertop1

 

You can even enable some power management settings for your hardware from within powertop if they’re not enabled already.

powertop2

 

For me personally, since I’m paranoid about security, I blacklisted the bluetooth and webcam modules completely so that they don’t load at boot by any chance as I don’t use those services anyway. That’s also a good way to save up on power. If you’re on systemd, you can create a file in /etc/modprobe.d/ with the following details to do the same.

blacklist

 

Next we move on to CPU related stuff, install Thermald from your package manager & enable it on boot time.

Thermald is a Linux daemon used to prevent the overheating of platforms. This daemon monitors temperature and applies compensation using available cooling methods. You can find further information on cpu power saving on the wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/CPU_frequency_scaling

 

Also laptops these days come up with different types of discrete cards from Nvidia to Radeon & the drivers you decide to use will also impact your battery life. Personally for me I find the use of discrete cards like Radeon unnecessary as I don’t do gaming on laptops. So I’ve also disabled the discrete card at boot time, running only the internal intel card to save power and it reduces the heat aswell keeping your laptop cool at all times. You can do the same by following this guide: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/hybrid_graphics#Fully_Power_Down_Discrete_GPU

 

Finally, there’s this full run down of everything that I’ve covered in Arch wiki which you can use as a reference: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Power_saving

 

Personally, after applying all the configuration changes the power usage on my laptop dropped from somewhere around 16-20W to about 11-14W. That my friend is a major drop in power usage. Usually I used to have a discrete card running at all times & due to lack of a working driver (new card) it used to run in the background without even being used resulting in such high power usage. Now I’ve finally been able to power down the GPU & thus my battery life has been extended from somewhere around 1-1.5 hr to 2.5-3 hours and best of all it’s cool at all times.

 

In the next part we discuss in details some of the advanced aspects of power saving I mentioned earlier & it can also boost your battery life quite significantly depending on your hardware, etc.

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One thought on “Power Saving GOD Mode on Linux (Part – 1)

  1. Hi,

    Thanks for collected Arch power saving information together.

    I’ve installed TLP and Powertop, battery life increased from 3.5 hours to 5 hours in playing video mode (SMPlayer). But there is a one note, it’s important to run Powertop script (that produce needed changes based on recommendations) after TLP, including after suspend operation. Since TLP clears values/flags that was configured by last Powertop script calling.

    I use this service script (not sure if it’s optimal, but seems to works):
    [Unit]
    Description=PowerTop
    After=tlp.service tlp-sleep.service suspend.target

    [Service]
    ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/powertop_tuning.sh
    ExecStop=/usr/local/bin/powertop_tuning.sh

    [Install]
    WantedBy=tlp.service tlp-sleep.service suspend.target

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